California WaterFix

FIXING

CALIFORNIA'S WATER SYSTEM

SECURING STATE WATER SUPPLIES

ALTERNATIVE 4A

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WHAT IS THE PROBLEM?

California's main water supply system is outdated and unreliable

1

OUR WATER SYSTEM IS OUTDATED AND UNRELIABLE

The existing system is inefficient and in need of repair so that it can withstand the impacts of climate change and seismic events, and reduce negative impacts on fish.

2

THE COST OF DOING NOTHING IS TOO GREAT

Without fixes to our water supply infrastructure, the environment and the state’s broader economy are at serious risk of water supply disruption, job loss, higher food and water prices, and significant species decline.

3

WE NEED TO PREPARE FOR CLIMATE CHANGE

Aging dirt levees are all that protect most of California’s water supplies from the effects of climate change. Rising sea levels, intense storms, and floods could all cause these levees to fail, which would contaminate our fresh water with salt, and disrupt water service to 25 million Californians.

4

OUR ENVIRONMENT IS SUFFERING

Existing operations cause reverse river flows, trap migrating fish, and have led to a decline in native fish populations.

A STATE-OF-THE-ART SOLUTION

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND INNOVATION

This prudent, realistic, science-driven, and achievable approach will fix California’s aging water delivery system and protect our economy and public safety. This approach is in response to an unprecedented level of public review and comment.

The project covers five main areas:

WATER SECURITY
CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
SEISMIC SAFETY
AFFORDABILITY

Fixing our water delivery system would improve the natural direction of river flows, help native fish species navigate to and from the ocean during critical migration periods, guard against water supply disruptions, and ensure that local water projects like recycling and groundwater recharge work better.

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PROJECT DETAILS

California WaterFix (WaterFix) is a bold, forward-thinking approach to California’s toughest water problems. It will modernize our aging water delivery system and go beyond the status quo to protect sensitive fish species. Key components include:

Protect our state’s water supplies from climate change through water system upgrades

Protect our state’s water supplies from climate change through water system upgrades

Improve river flows for threatened fish species

Improve river flows for threatened fish species

Ecosystem restoration and protection

Ecosystem restoration and protection

1
WATER DELIVERY UPGRADE
2 tunnels up to 150’ below ground designed to protect California’s water supplies

2 tunnels up to 150’ below ground designed to protect California’s water supplies

3 new intakes, each with 3,000 cubic-feet per second (cfs) capacity and an average annual yield of 4.9 million acre-feet

3 new intakes, each with 3,000 cubic-feet per second (cfs) capacity and an average annual yield of 4.9 million acre-feet

Protection against water supply disruption from failure of aging levees due to sea-level rise, earthquakes and flood events

Protection against water supply disruption from failure of aging levees due to sea-level rise, earthquakes and flood events

OPERATIONS
2
IMPROVED RIVER FLOWS
Reinstate a more natural direction of river flows in the South Delta by 46-160 percent

Reinstate a more natural direction of river flows in the South Delta by 46-160 percent

New criteria to protect spring outflow to San Francisco Bay

New criteria to protect spring outflow to San Francisco Bay

Criteria to protect Sacramento River flows and fish

Criteria to protect Sacramento River flows and fish

3
ENVIRONMENTAL ENHANCEMENTS

Based on ongoing review of potential construction and operational impacts, mitigation for California WaterFix construction and operation will include about 2,300 acres of habitat restoration and up to 13,300 acres of habitat protection (e.g. conservation easements). This additional acreage will focus primarily on preserving the habitat and working landscape values in the Delta. DWR and Bureau of Reclamation anticipate these revised acreage targets for habitat restoration and protection will be the maximum amount required for mitigation. Final determinations will be based on actual project impacts and consultation with fish and wildlife agencies. All habitat restoration and protection costs for California WaterFix will be paid for exclusively by water agencies benefiting from the project.

Separate from California WaterFix and over the next 5 years, California will pursue more than 30,000 acres of critical Delta restoration under the California EcoRestore program, pursuant to pre-existing regulatory requirements such as the 2008 and 2009 biological opinions and various enhancements to improve the overall health of the Delta ecosystem.

Proposition 1 funds and other state public dollars will be directed exclusively for public benefits unassociated with any regulatory compliance responsibilities.

Restore tidal and non-tidal wetland habitat to sustain habitat functions for native wildlife, such as the Giant Garter Snake and salmon

Improve habitat conditions along five miles of important juvenile salmon migration routes

Restore tidal and non-tidal wetland habitat to sustain habitat functions for native wildlife, such as the Giant Garter Snake and salmon

Restore tidal and non-tidal wetland habitat to sustain habitat functions for native wildlife, such as the Giant Garter Snake and salmon

Restore native riparian forest and scrub to support habitat for riverside species and improve linkages for terrestrial and other native species

Restore native riparian forest and scrub to support habitat for riverside species and improve linkages for terrestrial and other native species

Improve connectivity among existing patches of grassland and other natural habitats

Improve connectivity among existing patches of grassland and other natural habitats

Ecosystem Restoration and Protection
The cost to fix California’s primary water delivery system is estimated at $14.9 billion – or about $5 a month for urban water users – and will be paid for by public water agencies that rely on the supplies.

The cost to fix California’s primary water delivery system is estimated at $14.9 billion - or about $5 a month for urban water users – and will be paid for by public water agencies that rely on the supplies.

An Adaptive Management and Monitoring Program will guide real-time operations of the system.

An Adaptive Management and Monitoring Program will guide real-time operations of the system.

Our communities — farms, businesses, homes — and economy depend upon reliable, affordable, high quality water supplies.

Our communities - farms, businesses, homes - and economy depend upon reliable, affordable, high quality water supplies.

The time to act is now. Californians cannot afford a broken and unreliable water delivery system.

The time to act is now. Californians cannot afford a broken and unreliable water delivery system.

NEWS & INFORMATION

May 10, 2016 - Why we need the Delta water tunnels

Calleguas MWD President Op Ed in Ventura County Star

The Calleguas Municipal Water District Board of Directors was pleased to read the April 10 commentary by John Laird, state secretary for natural resources, on the California WaterFix proposal to build new intakes and tunnels to safeguard and stabilize water deliveries from the northern Sierra and Sacramento Delta.

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May 04, 2016 - CALIFORNIA ECORESTORE LAUNCHES CONSTRUCTION OF 7,370 ACRES OF CRITICAL DELTA HABITAT

New California EcoRestore Fact Sheet

After one year in operation, California EcoRestore has made considerable progress and expects to complete or have under construction over 7,370 acres of tidal and floodplain restoration, 2,680 feet of riparian habitat and 3 fish passage projects by 2017. This accelerated construction schedule is significantly more than all restoration completed in the Delta over the past 20 yearsand is a testament to the tangible progress that can be brought to bear through focused collaboration among state, local and federal partners.

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April 21, 2016 - CALIFORNIA LIFESTYLE RELIES ON DELTA WATER

CNRA Secretary Laird Op Ed in SF Chronicle

State Sen. Lois Wolk, D-Davis, earlier this month called for a "Plan B" to replace WaterFix, the state's proposal to upgrade 50-year-old infrastructure to deliver water in a more environmentally protective manner. Wolk suggests reducing water demand through efficiency and conservation, metering all uses of water, better managing groundwater and modernizing levees. On these things, we agree. The state is doing all of that, and more.

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NEWS ARCHIVE
PRESS CONTACT

Nancy Vogel, Deputy Secretary for Communications
916-653-9402

nancy.vogel@resources.ca.gov

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